Apple iMac 27-inch (late 2012)

Apple sticks to the fundamentals with the new iMac, relying on design, strong features and overall polish to maintain its leadership among high-end all-in-ones.


8.5
CNET Rating

View more from Apple »


Who would have guessed that Apple would become the standard bearer for traditional desktop computing?

Put away its beautiful new design, and the new iMac is mostly an iterative update. Granted, it's an iteration of the best all-around computer of 2011, but there's little in Apple's new all-in-one that we couldn't have predicted. The Intel "Ivy Bridge" third-gen Core CPU, Nvidia's most recent graphics chip, larger default memory — all of the iMac's new components come from the 2012 PC trend line.

Yes, Apple added Fusion, its own take on hybrid hard-drive technology. It also pared away the iMac's optical drive, and added a few design tweaks on top of the new chassis. None of that fundamentally changes the way you will use the iMac.

For many people, the iMac's absent touchscreen will be a positive, or at least not a negative. What they really care about is that this system is fast (it is that), good looking (also that) and comes with sufficient features for its price (and mostly that, too) — in other words, everything we traditionally look for in a new computer.

The new 27-inch iMac is an easy recommendation. For those who need or simply want a fast computer with a large, gloriously crisp display, the iMac — even our jumped-up, AU$2899 review model — delivers. If you want your PC to be something else — an organisational kiosk, a home entertainment hub — you're better served with another, more broadly ambitious, desktop.

Design

At first, we loved the new iMac when Apple unveiled it at a press event this past October. Then we felt deceived by Apple's presentation of it.

The pictures during the new iMac's unveiling made the new design appear completely flat, an impossibly thin triumph of manufacturing. In person, a bulging rear panel betrays the promise of thinness. Apple shows the truth of the iMac's chassis on a few images on its website, but it's hard to shake that disappointment when you realise that the new iMac is not quite as thin as Apple has made it out to be.

(Credit: Sarah Tew/CNET)

We were prepared to bring that scorn along with us into this review, but it didn't last. Bulge or no, the new design simply looks fantastic. For one, the back is tapered, such that you can stand 60 to 75 degrees off-centre, and the iMac still only looks as thin as its 5mm edge. Even when you take notice of the round back portion, the curve comes across as graceful.

We still find that Apple's "thin iMac" marketing has a certain disingenuous tang. That doesn't change the fact that this is a beautifully designed computer.

Along with revitalising the new iMac's profile, Apple has also taken noticeable steps to minimise the reflectivity of the iMac's notoriously glossy screen. Apple credits a new process for attaching the display glass to the chassis, and also a new method for applying the anti-reflective coating for the improvement. The benefits are immediately apparent if you set the iMac up next to other large-screen monitors.

Compared with both the Dell XPS One 27, as well as Apple's own Thunderbolt Display, the new iMac's screen is significantly less reflective. It's not perfect, but any reflections are more subtle. Image editors, or anyone who needs to use the iMac for close-in, detailed work, will welcome Apple's new approach ("I would use this display," said Lori Grunin, our camera editor).

(Credit: Sarah Tew/CNET)

The last major design note in the new iMac comes by way of its memory access port. The thin design means that Apple had to relocate memory slot access to the rear of the system. To open the port, you need to remove the power cable, push a button above the plug input and then pull off a plastic cover. This is only available on the 27-inch iMac; the 21.5-inch machine will need to be pre-configured with the amount of RAM that you require.

The mechanism has a surprisingly tough design. We needed to use a pen to push the button in far enough to eject the port cover. We see no real harm here, though. It's accessible enough, and you won't replace the memory so often that the port design will really get in your way.

Features

The Windows consumer PC market has only one clear competitor to the 27-inch iMac. HP Z1 fans, we know you're out there, but that system's Xeon CPU and pure workstation pedigree put that system in a specialised tier. The iMac can play in that pure professional arena, too, but given the iMac's predominantly consumer focus, Dell's XPS One 27 is the more appropriate comparison.

In that XPS One 27, Dell has a formidable competitor to the new iMac. Both systems have 27-inch, 2560x1440-pixel screens, the most current Intel and Nvidia silicon, solid-state hard-drive upgrades and an array of modern connectivity options that provide pathways for major additions in overall functionality.

Each system also has its advantages. The iMac's Thunderbolt ports open the door to fast external storage arrays, dedicated video-processing peripherals and other professional-grade devices. Apple also offers higher-end versions of Nvidia's GeForce 600-series graphics chips, which will benefit gamers and digital-media artists. The Fusion Drive also has a 128GB solid-state portion, larger than the 32GB solid-state hybrid drive option available in the highest-end XPS One 27.

(Credit: Sarah Tew/CNET)

On Dell's side of the chalkboard, the integrated HDMI input means that you can use the XPS One 27 as a stand-alone display without an adapter cable, like you'll need with the iMac. Along with the HDMI in, the Dell's Blu-ray drive and arguably its touchscreen make it easier to use as a home entertainment hub.

If you scoff at touch input, the Dell's screen doesn't hurt you if you want to rely on a traditional mouse-and-keyboard set-up. Windows 8, on the other hand, presents a real stumbling block for the Dell, given that it requires you to essentially learn a brand new operating system.

You can also upgrade the iMac beyond our review unit, adding a 768GB stand-alone solid-state drive (+AU$1560), and up to 32GB of RAM (+AU$725).

On the whole, the 27-inch iMac seems fairly priced. The lack of an optical drive is inconsequential, given how easy it is to add an external DVD burner. We also don't miss FireWire 800 on the iMac. Both USB 3.0 and Thunderbolt are faster. We only wish Apple provided a dedicated HDMI input. That would eliminate the need for a bothersome and expensive adapter box for those who want to input a consumer video component.

Via CNET.com



Add Your Review 3


* Below fields optional


Post comment as
 

LeonidK posted a comment   
Australia

This is the most ridiculous piece of garbage I have ever read as a reader.
Not only are you boasting about a pathetic apple computer which only a moron would pay for that price with a very very very sub par graphic card, you rate it against "dell" and "acer" where only a retard who knows nothing would buy there computers from.

You have made apple to look like god in the eyes of consumers. If anything, you should be comparing this system to other systems with similar specs? Dell also sponsor or make Alienware, dont see a comparison between Apple an Alienware, as Alienware would kick the **** out of apple.

Why would anyone want a touch screen monitor? that is the most ridiculous idea for a desktop. Id love to see how frustrated modern or better yet older users and students get when typing a 5000 word essay. Or trying to play a decent game like a first person shooter. This is a terrible product for its price.

 

Jeroend posted a comment   

Seriously? The lack of a touch screen is a bad thing? Come on! Do you really think people want to poke at their monitor, behind a desktop?That's why they developed the iPad and the touch control device thingie you place next to your keyboard. Are you for real?

 

Pining posted a comment   
Australia

..................It's not a touch screen.
Yet you give it an editor's choice.
Yesterday's tech, on a closed computer environment, for a ridiculously inflated cost price.
You note the new video chip will be great for gamers.......PLAYING WHAT GAMES!!!! Space Invaders??

You note that windows 8 gives Dell owners a problem in that hey need to learn a new operating system.
As opposed to apple, which gives you last years system with last years screen, but tells you it is easier to operate because you learnt it last year.

How much does apple sponsor this site?

 

n_zara posted a reply   
Australia

So a computer can't be good if it isn't touchscreen? Like a movie can't be good if isn't 3D?

Windows 8 ahead of OSX...really??? Next thing you will tell me is that a Windows tablet is ahead of an iPad or a Nexus?

Wonder how much you get paid to be an anti-apple troll?




Sponsored Links
CNET's latest

User Reviews / Comments  Apple iMac 27-inch (late 2012)

  • LeonidK

    LeonidK

    "This is the most ridiculous piece of garbage I have ever read as a reader.
    Not only are you boasting about a pathetic apple computer which only a moron would pay for that price with a very ve..."

  • Jeroend

    Jeroend

    "Seriously? The lack of a touch screen is a bad thing? Come on! Do you really think people want to poke at their monitor, behind a desktop?That's why they developed the iPad and the touch control de..."

  • Pining

    Pining

    "..................It's not a touch screen.
    Yet you give it an editor's choice.
    Yesterday's tech, on a closed computer environment, for a ridiculously inflated cost price.
    You note..."

CNET Speedtest

Recently Viewed Products