Asus G75VW

The G75VW is a very fine piece of engineering, something that any power user would be proud to wield.


9.0
CNET Rating
1.0
User Rating

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Craig was sucked into the endless vortex of tech at an early age, only to be spat back out babbling things like "phase-locked-loop crystal oscillators!". Mostly this receives a pat on the head from the listener, followed closely by a question about what laptop they should buy.


Asus' G75W sure is a pretty piece of machinery. Matte, textured black, brushed aluminium body, and a gorgeous 1920x1080 matte screen. It's still TN-based, but gosh, what a nice screen it is.

It's part of a decreasing family — that of the giant 17-inch gaming machines. It's a behemoth too, with stealth fighter-esque lines and a rear profile that looks like it was lifted straight from a high-powered super-car.

Connectivity

  • USB 3.0: 4
  • Optical: Blu-ray/DVD±RW
  • Video: VGA, HDMI, DisplayPort/Thunderbolt
  • Ethernet: gigabit
  • Wireless: 2.4GHz 802.11n, Bluetooth 4.0
  • Audio: 2.1 VIA HD audio

Despite the target market, Asus has taken the opposite tack to Alienware: no gaudy flashing lights or overwrought gamer tropes here. The design language exemplifies the philosophy of speaking quietly and carrying the big stick, refined power coiled and waiting to spring.

A large trackpad is present, which is pleasant to use, although an external mouse will clearly be used for more intense gaming. The keyboard is excellent and subtly backlit in white. For our review sample this lighting wasn't evenly distributed, but it didn't hamper visibility or use. Despite its size, the 4.5kg weight is not unreasonable.

It's also got a 3D capable screen and comes with Nvidia's active shutter glasses. Most gamers won't concern themselves with the marketing frivolity of stereoscopic gaming, but they will know it means something more interesting: the G75VW possesses a 120Hz screen. While this is liquid gold for desktop gamers, its use on the laptop will be limited, due to the extra graphical grunt required to hit frame rates worthy of the refresh. Still, for those playing less taxing games, this could be the road to silky smooth action.

The 3D functionality brings with it a major detractor though: Nvidia's Optimus software isn't compatible, so you can't switch to Intel graphics when you're not using GPU-taxing software. This is one laptop that can only spend minimal time away from the wall.

It should be said that the G75VW can also be discreet: running the Metro 2033 benchmark at highest detail didn't result in an exhaust noise that shattered ear drums — in fact, it was almost a peaceful whoosh of air. So we loaded up OCCT to see exactly how loud the thing could go. After about four minutes of the CPU test, it adopted a bit of a whistling tone, but didn't reach the point of offensive. A five minute run of the GPU test got a decent amount of air rushing out and approached the edge of a harsh tone, but there's one thing that's certain: this thing has some serious acoustic chops.

Turn it upside down, and you've got two accessible panels, with only two screws in total, holding them down. The first contains a fan and removable fan filter (Asus includes a second for the user to swap in), while the second contains another fan filter, the two hard drives and two DIMM slots for the RAM. Asus is to be commended for making user servicing so incredibly easy.

It's also the first Windows laptop we've seen with a Thunderbolt port. Thunderbolt still needs some polish on the Microsoft platform, but if the interface lives up to the promise, the future-proofing here is admirable.

So with dual terabyte hard drives, a Blu-ray drive, a GTX 670M with an overkill of 3GB video RAM, 16 GB system RAM and a Core i7 3610QM, it almost manages to hit every point along the way — except in audio.

Yes, even though the G75VW has a subwoofer on the bottom it lacks impact. You can turn up the LFE, and this definitely has an effect, but it also does something incredibly strange to the sound stage if set high, causing us to wince at the tricks it was playing on our ears. The tweeters are underpowered and have a tendency to distort; the chassis tends to vibrate annoyingly whenever the resonant frequency is hit, which seems to be quite often.

Even the VIA audio panel is second rate. Interestingly, a standard on most gaming laptops — the ability to reconfigure 3.5mm jacks to 5.1 sound — isn't here. There's only two jacks. We're not sure how many gamers actually use that option, but its omission is made obvious by both competitors and Asus' efforts on other platforms. At any rate, when gaming, you're better off sticking to headphones with this laptop — something that the target audience will definitely do, anyway.

Application performance

Choose a benchmark: Handbrake | iTunes | Photoshop | Multimedia

Handbrake encoding (in seconds)

(Shorter bars indicate better performance)


Clocked a little slower than its smaller Alienware friend, the G75VW falls just behind in the application tests. It's still a good sight faster than the last generation though, and it is more than capable for gaming.

Gaming performance

Batman: Arkham Asylum
Playable on:
VERY HIGH
settings
FPS
Max Avg Min
105 79 48
1920x1080, 4x AA, Detail level: Very high, PhysX off.
Metro 2033
Playable on:
MEDIUM
settings
FPS
Max Avg Min
126 41 10
1600x900, DirectX 10, MSAA 4x, Quality: Medium, PhysX: Off.
The Witcher 2
NOT
PLAYABLE
FPS
Max Avg Min
55 37 20
1366x768, low spec.
Skyrim
Playable on:
MEDIUM
settings
FPS
Max Avg Min
74 48 34
1920x1080, medium detail

We require a minimum frame rate of 30fps to deem a certain level of detail playable, with the exception of Metro 2033. This is because the Metro benchmark will stutter to around 10 frames per second on even the gruntiest of systems, something we've not experienced in playing the game itself.

Here, we're presented with a fascinating picture when you compare the Alienware M14x's GT 650M to Asus' GTX 670M. Rather than allow us to turn up the detail of the games that are playable, the 670M simply allows us to run the same detail at a higher resolution — that is, the G75VW's native resolution of 1920x1080, compared to the Alienware's 1600x900.

As a dot point, the 670M is just a rebadged 570M with a minor clock bump, while the GT 650M actually uses Nvidia's newer Kepler architecture. We anxiously await a machine with the newer, top end GTX 680M to see what it can do.

Battery Life

Battery life (time)

  • Heavy battery test
  • Light battery test

(Longer bars indicate better performance)


Big laptop, heavy hardware, very little battery. The 5200mAh battery runs out quickly, even on our light battery test — and without Intel graphics to switch to, it burns out even faster. Still, with a desktop gaming machine like this, you'd expect to be chained to the wall.

Conclusion

The G75VW is a very fine piece of engineering, something that any power user would be proud to wield. We'd prefer the stereoscopic 3D to be dumped for switchable graphics, and more attention put on audio, but the target market of this thing is going to be wearing headphones anyway. Now, about that GTX 680M version...



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SereneJ posted a comment   

Just bought one of these for my husband because he was jealous of my Qosmio... it has the same soft-touch surface coating as my dildo.

JamesR9 Facebook
1
Rating
 

"Disappointing"

JamesR9 posted a review   

The Good:It does have a few good things such as the resolution, not much else.

The Bad:Basically everything

Meh. Not that good, I own one, I cannot stand it's design, it isn't all that good with gaming, and the battery makes me sick. The Gamming isn't all that impressive either.

 

JamesR9 posted a comment   

AHAHAHHA wow. I own the Qosmio F750, The review was so different, It ways way less than this laptop, you said The Qosmio is heaps heavy, when it's 2 times lighter than this computer, My Qosmio is so much better than this computer, so you guys obviously cannot give a rating.

 

playboyjames posted a reply   
Australia

coming from the guy who spells weighs as "ways"...idiot

 

AlexT1 posted a comment   
Australia

ASUS G75VW Gaming Notebook
Intel Core i7 (3rd Gen) 3630M CPU
Full HD 17.3" HD LED backlight display with 1920 x 1080 resolution
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 670M with 3GB GDDR5
750 GB HDD / 7200 rpm
12GB DDR3 RAM

Is above spec, priced at au$1599 a solid buy? Or there's other alternative that offer similar spec for around the same price or cheaper?

 

StevenS2 posted a comment   

would this system suit a CAD software such as autocad

 

Ben546 posted a reply   
Australia

Yes this will run Autocad effortlessly

 

NitroWare.net posted a comment   
Australia

Would you say the G75 chassis is a signifcant upgrade/improvement over the G73/G74 ?

Readers may be keen to know that the G75VW is billeds as the world's first laptop to offer 802.11ac 'gigabit' wireless however if/when Australia gets versions equipped with the announced Broadcom wireless card has yet to be determined.

The complemntary 802.11ac ASUS router ships in North America/Europe in July from what ASUS has said.

Some of the high end outgoing units were fitted with Atheros N150 wireless so power users might want to check the Wi-Fi card if wireless is important to them but it can be upgraded to Intel without problem on the previous chassis.. Killer Networks Wireless should work.

Another question mark with this unit from some fans has been the GTX670/680M debate. On a technical level there is merit to having the newer better chip, and there are features and benefits to be had but do buyers really NEED the 680M in this unit?

Those who really want a 680M will find a suitable model, such as those offered by Eurocom however many gamers/enthusiasts would be satisifed such with the 670M offering as the end use might be just for infrequent high qualilty/high performance gaming.

 

Craig Simms posted a reply   
Australia

It's an iteration, not a huge upgrade. However the introduction of user serviceable dust vents shows the company has addressed at least that previous issue.

The review unit supplied to us contained an Atheros AR9485WB-EG -- a 2.4GHz chip only. Given the very little 802.11ac equipment out there at the moment, I would be surprised if the Australian G75VW had that option.




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User Reviews / Comments  Asus G75VW

  • SereneJ

    SereneJ

    "Just bought one of these for my husband because he was jealous of my Qosmio... it has the same soft-touch surface coating as my dildo."

  • JamesR9

    JamesR9

    Rating1

    "Meh. Not that good, I own one, I cannot stand it's design, it isn't all that good with gaming, and the battery makes me sick. The Gamming isn't all that impressive either."

  • JamesR9

    JamesR9

    "AHAHAHHA wow. I own the Qosmio F750, The review was so different, It ways way less than this laptop, you said The Qosmio is heaps heavy, when it's 2 times lighter than this computer, My Qosmio is s..."

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