Canon PowerShot G10

The Canon PowerShot G10 is a solid digital camera for enthusiasts who want something more compact to complement a dSLR, but its performance leaves something to be desired.


7.9
CNET Rating
9.0
User Rating

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Panasonic's Lumix DMC-G1 offers interchangeable lenses, Nikon's Coolpix P6000 provides GPS — the feature sets on enthusiast compact cameras are all over the place these days. So, should we be disappointed that the exciting new feature of Canon's PowerShot G10 is its almost-15-megapixel resolution? While this isn't the kind of update that will inspire envy in G9 owners or a must-have feature to experiment with, the G10 holds true to the elements that have made the G series a successful shooter's camera over the years.

Design
The G10 is physically quite similar to the G9. At 350 grams, it's heavier and it's also a bit bigger than its predecessor — its metal body also feels like a tank, but the thumb rest feels slippery so we wished that Canon gave us a bit more grip on the camera.

The dial configuration ranks as the most notable change to the design; Canon stacked the mode dial inside the ISO dial for right-hand operation and added an exposure compensation dial on the left. It retains the four-way switch (for setting manual focus, macro, flash, and drive mode) with a Function/Set button nested inside the navigational scroll wheel on the back. And though the focus point, metering, display, and menu buttons remain in the same positions, they now have an odd, angled design. Overall, we like the changes, and shooting with the G10 feels quick, fluid and comfortable. The optical viewfinder is relatively large and distortion-free, making it quite usable.

The new wide-angle lens on the G10 shows slightly worse-than-usual distortion, especially on the left side, when zoomed out to its 28mm-equivalent view.
(Credit: Lori Grunin/CNET.com)

Though Canon giveth with the improved wide-angle coverage, it taketh away in total zoom range. The new optically stabilised f/2.8-4.8 28-140mm-equivalent 5x lens should please landscape photographers, but some folks will miss the 210mm-equivalent reach of the G9. That and the move to a 1/1.7-inch 14.7-megapixel CCD from a 12-megapixel version constitute the most notable feature changes.

At least they haven't taken away the best parts of the G9 — the built-in neutral-density filter, two slots on the mode dial for custom settings, ability to change the size of the AF area, a hot shoe, exposure lock, raw support, and the bayonet adapter mount — that help distinguish the G10 as a camera for enthusiasts. The addition of Servo AF is nice as well, but it's odd to use while holding the camera out for LCD view, and unlike on an SLR, there's no focus-area confirmation in the G10's viewfinder. We think it will take some getting used to.

Features
Most of the new capabilities enhanced by the switch to a newer generation Digic 4 processor — face detection improvements, face detection self-timer, and i-Contrast automatic correction — are probably more important to the audience of snapshot-camera users than the manual enthusiasts who tend to buy the G series models. One capability we wished Canon had enhanced is the movie capture: it's still 30fps VGA without optical zoom.

Performance and Image Quality

Although the G10's noise numbers are slightly higher across the board than the G9's, visually the results look better. They're definitely usable up to ISO 400, but detail starts to degrade at ISO 800 and pretty much disappears by ISO 1600. (Click image to enlarge)
(Credit: CNET Labs/CNET.com)

Unfortunately, performance is mixed compared with the G9. Time to first shot is a quick 1.3 seconds, faster than the G9's 1.7-second start. In bright light, a relatively quick focus helps keep the shutter lag to a zippy-for-its-class 0.4 second. In dim light, that increases to a 0.8 second. Both are improvements over its predecessor. Two shots in a row have a decent 2.2-second gap between, a bit slower than the G9's 2 seconds, and adding flash recycle bumps that to a not-very-speedy 2.9 seconds. Continuous shooting is 1.4fps, down from the G9's 1.7fps. The AF system is pretty responsive, though no one would confuse this with an SLR. The 3-inch LCD is big and bright, but sucks quite a bit of power; the camera's battery is only rated for 400 shots with it on, but 1,000 without it.

The primary reason to buy a camera like this, however, is the photo quality, and here the G10 doesn't disappoint. Colour and exposures are great. There's some wide-angle distortion at the 28mm-equivalent maximum, but photos have very good centre and edge-to-edge sharpness at longer focal lengths. ISO 80 and 100 produce relatively pristine images and if you're alert to it, you'll see some noise-suppression artefacts starting at ISO 200. But photos look quite usable up to and including ISO 400; at ISO 800 they get visibly soft.

Shooting speed (in seconds)
(Shorter bars indicate better performance)
Time to first shot
Raw shot-to-shot time
Typical shot-to-shot time
Shutter lag (dim)
Shutter lag (typical)
Canon PowerShot G10
1.3
2.5
2.2
0.8
0.4
Canon PowerShot G9
1.7
2.6
2
1
0.5

Typical continuous-shooting speed (in frames per second)
(Longer bars indicate better performance)
Canon PowerShot G10
1.4


Conclusion
Though we can't yet compare it with competitors like the Nikon Coolpix P6000 or the Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX3, users of the G9 or previous models who want the higher resolution and who won't miss the extra lens reach won't be disappointed. Only the mixed performance — not bad, just not as fast as it should be for the price — brings down its overall rating. And even if the Canon PowerShot G10 eventually turns out to not be best-in-class for whatever reason, it's still a great camera.

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FEET posted a comment   

The Good:sharp photo's great colour, solid as a rock

The Bad:miss 210mm equivalent focal length as on G9

versatile camera - a real compliment to a SLR. A great all round camera excellent to put in your pocket for that unexpected photo. Not as good as an SLR digital, however it was never meant to be

Samwise
9
Rating
 

Samwise posted a review   
United Kingdom

The Good:Crisp, sharp photos at normal ISO levels. The wider angled lens compared to the G9 is great for me, and the display and menu are much better than my previous Olympus.

The Bad:Pictures are a bit noisy at 400 or above - but hey do people forget what 400 & 800 ASA film was like? The viewfinder is poor, but as I can't use it under water it worries me not!

the G9 was very good, and this is better. I wouldn't say that the current difference in price warrants an upgrade, but for my use (which is mainly under water), and if you look for one of the deals currently out there, this is a great camera.

mark_er
9
Rating
 

mark_er posted a review   

The Good:Amazed at the sharpness and accuracy at ISO 80 and 100 - where most shooting should be done. The menus are easy to navigate, and on-screen adjustments for Tv, Av and exposure comp are cleverly implemented.

The Bad:24mm width would be nice, and a slightly faster lens. But then again, none of these compacts are perfect yet.

Excellent versatile camera - literally solid as a rock. Don't quite get the fuss about shooting speed in the review - i've taken about 200 shots over the past couple of days with it and it's perfectly fine for what it is. Image quality is great and colours spot on - really, that's what it's all about.




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User Reviews / Comments  Canon PowerShot G10

  • FEET

    FEET

    "versatile camera - a real compliment to a SLR. A great all round camera excellent to put in your pocket for that unexpected photo. Not as good as an SLR digital, however it was never meant to be"

  • Samwise

    Samwise

    Rating9

    "the G9 was very good, and this is better. I wouldn't say that the current difference in price warrants an upgrade, but for my use (which is mainly under water), and if you look for one of the deals..."

  • mark_er

    mark_er

    Rating9

    "Excellent versatile camera - literally solid as a rock. Don't quite get the fuss about shooting speed in the review - i've taken about 200 shots over the past couple of days with it and it's perfe..."

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