Crest Wireless TV Link

The Wireless TV Link works simply, and while it has its fiddly moments, it's an inexpensive way to retransmit your video sources around your home.


7.1
User Rating


Crest's Wireless TV Link kit allows you to rebroadcast any video signal to any point around your house, and while that theoretically means you could use it for DVD or even console games, Crest promotes it primarily via the ability it gives you to control Pay TV transmissions and have them running in different points in the house without needing to pay additional fees for seperate Pay TV boxes or connections. That may or may not break the contract conditions of your Pay TV provider -- and given that it has a range of 100m, you may also start inadvertently broadcasting to the neighbours -- but it's overall a neat little piece of AV equipment, and easy enough for just about anyone to set up and get running.

Design
The Wireless TV Link kit comprises two main silver plastic boxes -- one receiver and one transmitter -- along with the necessary power adapters and cabling to connect it to any RCA video source. The boxes are essentially identical -- but thankfully labelled -- and relatively unobtrusive, although if your home theatre decor tends towards black rather than silver, they could stand out a touch. An additional IR cable offers the ability to hide the unit away if it truly does clash too much with your decor -- although more on that below.

The receiver and transmitter boxes both feature short stubby antennae that can be placed in any angle along a 180 degree arc; in our testing we found this had little impact on our picture quality, but as each home setup will vary, it's good to be able to simply change the angle. A button on the left hand side swiches the unit on or off, while a left hand button toggles between three available channels. Crest doesn't sell individual standalone recievers for this kit, so it's really a one to one connection method, unless you want to plump for another transmitter that you may not use.

Features
Setting up the Wireless TV Link involves plugging in the transmitter and receiver units into whatever source and destination you wish to transmit. The connections for this are both via RCA cables, which raises a few interesting issues for anyone pondering the kit. Firstly, there aren't many video sources that offer multiple RCA outputs, and the TV Link's transmiter doesn't act as a pass-through, so if you're using (as we did) an analog Foxtel Pay TV box, you've either got to sacrifice its output in its original location in order to broadcast it further, or use a potentially lower quality video source, such as coaxial, to keep both signals running. Additionally, if you were planning to retransmit to an older TV that only had coaxial inputs, you'd need to put a VCR or similar device in place to accept the Wireless TV Link Reciever's RCA inputs.

If you just want to transmit signals to another room in the house -- the unit claims a range of up to 100m, although we suspect if your house runs for more than 100m you can probably afford multiple Pay TV boxes -- then that's all you need to do to get the TV Link working. It also offers the capability to remotely control your video source via an IR link, and the unit we tested came with a promotional bonus -- a 4-device Universal Remote control that's essentially the little brother of the Crest TCP6 Platinum Universal Remote Control. Setting up the IR link can be done in one of two ways. If your setup allows you to point the transmitter box at your video source's IR port, then you're set. If not, Crest supplies a cable with an IR point at the end that can be snaked around to point at the correct spot. In our testing, however, we had no luck whatsoever with getting the IR cable to actually work. With the box pointed at the IR, however, we were able to effortlessly change Pay TV channels while lounging in bed or working in the study of a suburban home.

Performance
In our testing, the signals we got from the TV Link were as good as you could expect from equipment connecting via RCA cables -- certainly good enough for most medium to low end TV equipment that people tend to deck out bedrooms and children's rooms with. We did hit some interference with the unit -- running around the 2.4GHz frequency you can expect microwaves and home wireless networking kit to possibly impact picture reception -- but nothing that you wouldn't expect with say, a normal TV antenna in poor weather.


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abbu posted a comment   

hey I AM LOOKING SOME DEVICE WHICH DONT NEED ANY ANTEENA AND CABLE. COULD ANY ONE SUGGEST ME PLEASE

 

Steve posted a comment   

Are you only able to watch the channel that is playing on the master TV or can you have two different channels going at once with this product?

zinnia
2
Rating
 

zinnia posted a review   

Got a picture and audio easy enough (had to buy a new foxtel cable, you know the ones with the AV leads on one end and that big rectangle thing on the other) and you plug the AV leads from that straight into the transmitter. The interference is so bad that you can't really watch it and I have it set up about 10 meters away. Really it is useless

shaun
2
Rating
 

shaun posted a review   

goodday,well i get foxtel to the other tv but cant get the sound to work as the foxtel box has only a yellow outlet for plug in so red an white for sound have no where to plug into any help would be great as giving up and thinking taking back for refund

osdsases
6
Rating
 

osdsases posted a review   

i guess i was looking for a wireless way to connect from one tv to another in my house. This sounds like the right product instead of using slingbox. am i right?

Jerry Jackson
7
Rating
 

Jerry Jackson posted a review   

Do you have a device (antenna) that I can hook to a cable outlet in the house and the connect another device (antenna) to the TV which is in another room that has no cable outlet. Would like to have a TV in my bedroom but the cable outlet is in the living room. Please send me an email at jerryjackson@hawaii.rr.com

 

"Didn't meet expectations"

Colin Mills posted a comment   

I've jiggled things, repositioned things and switched off basically every other electronic device in the house but continue to get interference that badly affects both the picture and audio quality. My Foxtel remote control doesn't work with the second TV either. Can't work it out. Ready to give up. Any advice gratefully received.

GM
1
Rating
 

"IR works fine on Foxtel digital"

GM posted a review   

Response to Anthony Wall: Finally got the IR point to change channels - place the IR point [using the sticky back to attach] directly above the foxtel box IR point - the majority of the bulb [big end pointing down] should be exposed to the transmitter IR point [both IR points should be directly lined up about 4 inches apart] - works fine - you may have to adjust to suit your conditions but make sure the majoirty of the bulb is exposed to the transmitter IR point. This is how I used to IR link my laptop to my mobile phone.

 

"2.4 Gig a problem with everything"

Anonymous posted a comment   

Alan
1
Rating
 

"Suits my needs"

Alan posted a review   

Great product, however I have needed to buy 2 sets. Having trouble controlling AUSTAR decoder if other reciever is on, turn it off and works! any ideas?


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User Reviews / Comments  Crest Wireless TV Link

  • abbu

    abbu

    "hey I AM LOOKING SOME DEVICE WHICH DONT NEED ANY ANTEENA AND CABLE. COULD ANY ONE SUGGEST ME PLEASE"

  • Steve

    Steve

    "Are you only able to watch the channel that is playing on the master TV or can you have two different channels going at once with this product?"

  • zinnia

    zinnia

    Rating2

    "Got a picture and audio easy enough (had to buy a new foxtel cable, you know the ones with the AV leads on one end and that big rectangle thing on the other) and you plug the AV leads from that str..."

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