Dell 3008WFP

With a crazy number of inputs, 1080p over component and good rendering of 1080i, this screen has set itself up as a potential TV replacement, let alone a huge monitor. This one's the new king.


8.9
CNET Rating
7.9
User Rating

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Update: Dell has sent us updated information detailing that the 3008WFP uses an S-IPS panel, not an S-PVA as previously advised

The monstrous Dell 30-inch screen has a successor -- the 3008WFP. Listening to complaints from consumers about the lack of video inputs in its predecessor, Dell has responded with a resounding "we hear you" and has gone ludicrously overboard -- and we love it.

Design
Taking on the aesthetics of its smaller 27-inch sibling, this imposing screen has a dark aluminium bezel surrounding the panel, while the screen itself is attached to a piano black and silver stand, all in one piece.

While we prefer the ruggedness of the old 3007WFP's height adjustment, the new mechanism works just fine, as well as offering the required tilt and swivel control. The front section of the neck can be pulled away, cables threaded and then cover replaced for discreet cable management.

Features
The 3008WFP is built on an S-IPS panel and uses a WCCFL backlight, claiming to be able to show 117 percent of the NTSC colour gamut, theoretically allowing for greater distinction between colour tones and providing better colour accuracy. Colour calibration should also be made a little easier thanks to the sRGB and Adobe RGB presets included. The PC/Mac Gamma and RGB/YPbPr input modes make a return from the previous model, however this monitor has a few new tricks up its sleeve.

The first major point is the single biggest change between revisions -- the 3008WFP has ever so slightly trumped its predecessor's single DVI port by including two DVI ports, one HDMI, Composite, S-Video, VGA, and even DisplayPort. DisplayPort is lining itself up to be the successor to VGA/DVI, and Dell expects this to be mainstream by 2009 -- so the screen is future-proofed nicely.

The 3008 is now capable of 1:1, Aspect and Fill scaling modes as a result, offers sharpness control, a dynamic contrast ratio of 3000:1 (which can be turned off, reducing it to 1000:1), user enabled DDC/CI (so your graphics card can adjust your monitor settings) and a Picture By Picture (PBP) mode with a confusing implementation. After a bit of fiddling we figured it out -- first set the source (what appears on the right hand side) using the OSD, from which you can choose DVI-D 1, DVI-D 2, HDMI, Composite or S-Video. Next turn PBP on and cycle through Component, VGA or DisplayPort for the left hand side. Sadly you can't put DVI-1 next to DVI-2 or HDMI -- we can only assume the three digital ports use some of the same equipment so it doesn't lend to sharing the signals.

The introduction of a scaler chip means you no longer need to have a dual-link DVI equipped video card to display on the screen, and lesser devices like laptops and so forth should be able to display up to 1920 x 1200, or in the case of media devices 1080p. 1080i looks fantastic compared to previous Dell monitors, and as an added bonus, our Xbox 360 played 1080p content just fine over the component connection. The PlayStation 3 looked similarly spectacular over HDMI at both 1080i and 1080p.

While it is a non-glossy screen, with a completely black background it reflected enough of our silhouette to be slightly disturbing. On a light background, this was completely unnoticeable. More noticeable is what we can only suppose to be the viewing angles at work -- with the head placed in the middle of the screen and a black background set, the corners seemed as if some white light was bleeding from them -- but shifting our head so we faced these corners caused the issue to disappear. One of the few downsides of having such a massive screen that you need to turn your head to see it all!

If you hook up through HDMI, you can also pass the audio stream through the monitor to your 5.1 sound set-up, or downmix to 2.0/2.1 channel on the fly, assuming that you're using 3.5mm connections for your sound set-up. This functionality won't extend to your consoles if you hook up through Composite or Component though, as no RCA audio connectors are supplied. A power socket is though, which is there purely for the optional Dell soundbar.

For connectivity, four USB ports are featured (two under the monitor, two on the side), and a card reader on the left hand side supports xD/SD/MS/MMC and CF.

Included in the box are DVI, VGA and DisplayPort cables, as well as a cleaning cloth.

Performance
Pushing the screen through DisplayMate, it was capable of discerning all greyscale tones from 0-255. While the gradients weren't the most impressive we've seen and tended to crush to black a little quickly, they were certainly acceptable. Gaming in Crysis was sublime, although running it at the native resolution of 2,560 x 1,600 proved to be a little bit too much for our 8800GTX graphics card. Movies similarly were great, and the pure size of the screen and resolution will mean architects, 3D creators, video editing junkies and desktop publishing kids will love it.

With a crazy number of inputs, 1080p over component and good rendering of 1080i, this screen has set itself up as a potential TV replacement, let alone a huge monitor. This one's the new king.

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Sports Shooter
9
Rating
 

Sports Shooter posted a review   

The Good:Big

The Bad:Had to send 1st one back..backlight bleed through uneven.

Love the monitor, Photoshop CS5 is much easer to work with all this space!!..it replaced a 27" And it still impressed me.
Super Price deal througth local Dell $850 +shipping. I could not pass it up. Still going to get a Colormuki to calibrate monitor with my Canon IPF6100

Jamie
9
Rating
 

Jamie posted a review   

The Good:Huge, Great Color Reproduction

The Bad:1 stuck sub pixel

My original unit died after 1 year of use, but Dell got me a brand new unit out for the next business day. Still loving this monitor. Windows 7 Aero-Snap is a must because the sheer size of the desktop lends itself to having windows on each side (WindowSpace for Vista can do the same thing).

Dodge
10
Rating
 

Dodge posted a review   

The Good:inputs, sheer size, elegant design

The Bad:only bad thing is that ppl find something to complain about, this monitor is perfect

i have been using this monitor for 6months now, it is truly unbelievable, for games, design and movies, its makes everything look better and feel better!!

 

Night_Sailor posted a comment   

The Good:Big, Big,Big

The Bad:Perhaps I need to play around with it more. I don't think it is very sharp

Purchased for $1099 plus tax. I finally got the price I wanted on April 16th 2009,but I am disappointed with the sharpness.

I need to play around with it some, perhaps a better cable will help. I've tried some of the settings. Generally it looks like linen paper with fine cross hatching. So far I liked my 1600x1200 24" better. I may set them up side by side to compare them.

 

chentiangemalc posted a reply   

are you using it at 2560 x 1600 native resolution?

all LCD monitors don't look sharp when used at non-native resolution.

Patanjali
9
Rating
 

Patanjali posted a review   

Additions to my Review below.

Still a 9/10 despite the Cons below, though I would prefer the 3008 panel with 3007 styling

Patanjali
9
Rating
 

Patanjali posted a review   

The Good:- DVDs look great, BlueRay at 1920x1080p looks fantastic - sharp

- Handles video (component) better than 2405 - almost as good as HDMI

- 2560x1600 allows editing three portrait A4 pages side-by-side at 100% in Word

The Bad:- Need Dual-Link DVI-I graphics card - nVidia GeForce 8600GT cards at ~$100 will drive two 30" silently (but hot)

- Monitor-base mounting a bit spongy, screen moves when pusing the buttons

- Slightly unbalanced - had to put something under one end to make it horizontal

- Too many inputs! I only use DVI-I and Component, but have to push the spongy button through all the unused inputs to change - should only cycle through the inputs that actually have a live signal using the button and allow switching to any through the OSD as it does now.

Generally, the 3007 monitor-base join more stable

Nice monitor. I have a 3007 as well but prefer the 3007s styling. 3008 is set bright out-of-the box. I use a Color Munki to calibrate them. Both are inherently brighter than my 2405.

24" monitors are still the best $/Mpx, but if you need large expanses of contiguous pixels (that is, no need for gap as with multiple smaller monitors), 30" cannot be beat for the price ($1850 on special in Jan 2009).

Except for the cons, this would be a 10

Bacon
7
Rating
 

Bacon posted a review   

The Good:Brings high resolution picture quality.
Compact design.
Light in weight but reliable.

The Bad:Costly.

Dell introduce a great monster in electronics world. I like its size. But its very very costly and on which system it will run that system must be ultra super computer other wise its not compatible with simple one.

New Trend
7
Rating
 

New Trend posted a review   

The 3008WFP widescreen LCD, everyone's favorite, 30-inch, DisplayPort-rocking Dell monitor is up for review, and we've got a roundup to prove it. If you'll recall, the behemoth is the first Dell monitor to sport the emerging DisplayPort technology, and it also offers a fairly impressive set of other connectivity options, including dual DVI ports, HDMI, VGA, S-Video, component, and composite. The folks at Hot Hardware weren't totally stoked on the setup process, but loved the screen's performance and flexibility. The cats at Computer Shopper seemed pleased as well, though not head-over-heels in love, particularly with the high price tag and color / grayscale "weakness." CNET Australia had similarly high marks, praising the number of inputs, super-high resolution, and sheer size, though they took issue with the screen's reflectiveness, the need for a high-end graphics card, and gradient handling.

New trend
8
Rating
 

New trend posted a review   

t looks like Dell's on again, off again relationship with its top-end 3008WFP monitor has taken another turn, with the company now suggesting that


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User Reviews / Comments  Dell 3008WFP

  • Sports Shooter

    Sports Shooter

    Rating9

    "Love the monitor, Photoshop CS5 is much easer to work with all this space!!..it replaced a 27" And it still impressed me.
    Super Price deal througth local Dell $850 +shipping. I could not pa..."

  • Jamie

    Jamie

    Rating9

    "My original unit died after 1 year of use, but Dell got me a brand new unit out for the next business day. Still loving this monitor. Windows 7 Aero-Snap is a must because the sheer size of the des..."

  • Dodge

    Dodge

    Rating10

    "i have been using this monitor for 6months now, it is truly unbelievable, for games, design and movies, its makes everything look better and feel better!!"

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