Eye-Fi Pro X2

The Eye-Fi card is an excellent way to give wireless and sharing capabilities to cameras. It's easy to use and a reasonably affordable solution that allows connectivity with computers, tablets and smartphones.


9.0
CNET Rating
7.5
User Rating

About The Author

CNET Editor

Lexy spent her formative years taking a lot of photos and dreaming in technicolour. Nothing much has changed now she's covering all things photography related for CNET.


The Eye-Fi Pro X2 is a nifty little SDHC card with built-in Wi-Fi that supports 802.11n. This means that it's able to connect to a computer, tablet or smartphone in order to transfer photos.

The Pro X2 is the top-of-the-line model, equipped with 8GB of storage and class-6 speed. It also comes with video and RAW support. The other Eye-Fi cards work on the same principles as the Pro X2, but with lesser capacities.


It's theoretically possible to use an Eye-Fi card in any digital camera that supports the SD card format. You can check whether there are any compatibility issues or notes for a particular camera model on the Eye-Fi site. Cameras that have been branded as being Eye-Fi compatible often have menu options where you can turn the Wi-Fi on and off, as well as observe what network the card is connecting to.

The Eye-Fi comes packaged in a neat cardboard enclosure that includes an instruction manual, the card itself and a USB card reader.

Computer set-up

To get things started, you first need to install the Eye-Fi Centre (Mac/PC) which installs from the card itself. The process is simple, and takes a few moments to update firmware on the card before it's ready to go. Then set up an Eye-Fi account from within the interface.

The Centre is how you tell the Eye-Fi card what wireless network to connect to, as well as setting up all the other options. On top of storing the images on the card and transferring them to your computer, the Centre can automatically send photos to any number of sites, like Facebook, Flickr or your own FTP server.

The main Eye-Fi Centre interface.
(Screenshot by CBSi)

In order to get the camera-to-PC/Mac wireless transfer working, you need to set the wireless network name and password (if applicable) in the Eye-Fi software. Details of up to 32 Wi-Fi networks can be added to the card.

Once the network connection has been established between camera and computer, transfer is near instantaneous. It is only a touch slower to initiate a transfer than to tether your camera to a computer with a cable.

Depending on the size of the JPEG images taken, which you can set in-camera, it will take anywhere from 10 to 60 seconds for the transfer of individual images to come across to your computer. RAW photos take quite a bit longer, and so do videos.

You can keep shooting on your camera while the images are transferring. Transfer speed depends on the proximity to your wireless router and/or the strength of the wireless connection.

Direct mode

On top of sending the images to a computer, the Eye-Fi card can also establish an ad hoc network with an Android or iOS device. When there are no available Wi-Fi networks to connect to — for example, if you are travelling or out and about — the card can automatically send images to your mobile device.

The Direct Mode needs to be selected in the Eye-Fi Centre, and has several options that you can tweak when the card is connected to your computer.
(Screenshot by CBSi)

There are dedicated apps available, but before setting them up, you need to enable Direct mode from within the Eye-Fi Centre software.

When connected to a smartphone or tablet, the transfer begins automatically within 20 seconds, and there's a notification once the photos have been sent across to the device.

The Pro X2 offers geotagging of images, even if your camera does not have a built-in GPS transmitter. It appends location information to images as determined by the Wi-Fi positioning service. We found it to be pretty accurate, honing in on a location within 20 metres of our location.

The Android app in action, showing the library of photos and the recent transfer from the Eye-Fi card.
(Screenshot by CBSi)

Eye-Fi also offers an online storage option called Eye-Fi View for its X2 cards, where you can store images for up to seven days, and share them privately with friends. There's also a Premium service, which offers so-called "unlimited" storage for US$4.99 per month or US$49.99 per year.

Read/write speeds to the card did not seem to be affected by the wireless transfers, which means that you can happily snap away without worrying about waiting for the card to catch up.

Conclusion

The Eye-Fi card is an excellent way to give wireless and sharing capabilities to cameras. It's easy to use and a reasonably affordable solution that is flexible enough to provide tethering-like results when near a computer with a router, or on the road in Direct mode with a smartphone or tablet.

Other variants of the Eye-Fi card available in Australia include the Connect X2 for AU$59.99 and the Mobile X2 for AU$99.99.



Add Your Review 4


* Below fields optional


Post comment as
AnthonyB1 Facebook
10
Rating
 

"Love myEye-Fi"

AnthonyB1 posted a review   

The Good:Top quality Photos downloaded whilst on the move!

The Bad:Nothing to dislike once set up!

I have been using a 16gb ProX2 In my Canon Powershot G15 for over 2 years downloading photos onto n Ipad 2. This provides top quality high resolution photos which I can then email or use on social media. The photo quality is vastly superior to any Ipad photo! Backed up via Icloud and also loaded onto a PC when at Home.
Fabulous solution whilst travelling!

 

JasonN posted a comment   

It's worth considering to use if you're mainly shooting in jpeg format, as raw file transfers are to me personally an unreasonable wait time if your shooting in quick succession. Direct mode has the least wait time if you wish to review your images quickly. The only work wound would be individually select the protect option to your images on camera for the particular images you wish to transfer wirelessly or shoot both raw + jpeg ( set to automatically transfer jpegs wirelessly only) to view on your mobile device and use the raw image for editing in Lightroom or photoshop later.I agree that wifi file transfer through a router is unreasonably slow if your time is critical in a workflow standpoint. I use a 8 GB Eye-Fi card with a Canon 5D Mark II with a CF adaptor to review captured images on an iPad in direct mode file transfer. Does the job consistently enough for jpeg review and I edit raw format files when I get back home. Downside is the card fills up quite quickly. If you solely shoot in raw format or are not willing to use the work around as I previously mentioned, I wouldn't recommend getting this product..

Breamo
5
Rating
 

"Great when it works"

Breamo posted a review   
Australia

The Good:Workflow

The Bad:Inconsistent wifi connection - keep dropping out

I bought a Eye Fi Connect X2 4GB in Apr 2013. The concept was great but it is just too inconsistent in performance.

I have a Nikon D80 and D7000 and tried on both. And results are similar.

Basically, I have been able to make the card work on both Home network wifi mode as well as direct access mode. BUT .... the wifi connection is so inconsistent that it is not workable. So what a shame, otherwise, it is a great workflow. I would not recommend touching these unless you are prepared for hours of frustration.

Kudo to Target as I bought it there and return is not an issue.

 

Will1505 posted a comment   

This is very cool but still a few years away from being viable given the price. May as well get a card and a USB 3.0 card reader for half the price

 

DemetriM posted a reply   

Given what price Will?

 

Will1505 posted a reply   

as the article states, $119.95 for 8gb




Sponsored Links
CNET's latest

User Reviews / Comments  Eye-Fi Pro X2

  • AnthonyB1

    AnthonyB1

    Rating10

    "I have been using a 16gb ProX2 In my Canon Powershot G15 for over 2 years downloading photos onto n Ipad 2. This provides top quality high resolution photos which I can then email or use on social ..."

  • JasonN

    JasonN

    "It's worth considering to use if you're mainly shooting in jpeg format, as raw file transfers are to me personally an unreasonable wait time if your shooting in quick succession. Direct mode has th..."

  • Breamo

    Breamo

    Rating5

    "I bought a Eye Fi Connect X2 4GB in Apr 2013. The concept was great but it is just too inconsistent in performance.

    I have a Nikon D80 and D7000 and tried on both. And results are simi..."

CNET Speedtest

Recently Viewed Products