Fujitsu LifeBook E8410

The well-rounded Fujitsu LifeBook E8410 gives corporate users a broad feature set, enterprise-level security, and decent performance and battery life.


7.3
CNET Rating


The midsize Fujitsu LifeBook E8410 is by no means flashy, but the laptop has a lot to offer business users, starting with a thorough feature set that includes nearly every port and connection a business user could need, plus serious data security that includes a smart card reader and a Trusted Platform Module. When it comes to performance, the LifeBook E8410 matches that of comparable systems from Lenovo, with one exception: our review unit's 1GB of RAM held it back on our Photoshop CS2 test. Price wise, the AU$2,699 LifeBook E8410 costs a little more than a similarly configured Lenovo ThinkPad T61 -- though the latter lacks some ports and makes you choose between a smart card reader and an ExpressCard slot. And buyers who don't need such a robust feature set can save even more money with the Lenovo 3000 N200. But corporations that need enterprise-level features and security would do well to consider the fully stocked Fujitsu LifeBook E8410.

The LifeBook E8410 is all business black on the outside, but opening the notebook reveals a silvery-white interior. With a magnesium lid, steel hinges, spill-resistant keyboard and shock-mounted hard drive, the LifeBook E8410 seems solid enough to handle the knocks and bumps of everyday business life. Though its case size is very similar to Fujitsu's consumer-oriented LifeBook A6030, the LifeBook E8410 weighs a tiny bit less than its sibling and is among the lightest midsize laptops we've seen.

Our LifeBook E8410's 15.4-inch, wide-screen display featured a fairly standard 1,280x800 native resolution. The screen's glossy finish successfully walks the line between impressive colour and excess reflection. Our review unit also included a 1.3-megapixel Webcam for video conferencing.

The keyboard on the LifeBook E8410 is full-size and comfortable to use. Fujitsu offers two mousing configurations, either touch pad only or touch pad plus pointing stick. Our review unit included just the touch pad, but still had two sets of mouse buttons; they didn't affect the laptop's usability, they just looked strange without the accompanying quick point. The bottom set of mouse buttons frames a tiny fingerprint reader for storing Web passwords and logging on to your computer or a network. The touch pad itself was functional, if small (63.5mm by 38.1mm). Above the keyboard sit five buttons that can be programmed to launch the application of your choice, an appreciated extra particularly on a buttoned-up business system. Also above the keyboard sits a 76mm long black and white LCD status display that takes the place of the multiple bright LED status lights typically found on a laptop -- a useful feature that cuts down on distraction when you're working. Rounding out the package, the laptop has a Wi-Fi on/off switch on the front lip. Unsurprising for a business system, the LifeBook E8410 lacks any external media controls -- we'd have liked at least a volume wheel -- and its speakers emit tinny, weak sound.

The Fujitsu LifeBook E8410 includes every port a worker could possibly need, including legacy serial and parallel ports for businesses using older or specialised peripherals. The system includes two sets of stacked USB ports, one pair on the laptop's left edge and one pair on the back; their distribution helps cut down on cord crowding. Built on Intel's Centrino Pro platform, the LifeBook E8410 includes the latest 802.11a/g/n wireless, but WWAN is conspicuously absent; users who want cellular connectivity will have to rely on a PC Card or ExpressCard. Corporate buyers will be pleased to know that the LifeBook E8410 piles on corporate-level security measures, including not only a fingerprint reader but also a smart card slot and an internal Trusted Platform Module.

On benchmarks, the LifeBook E8410 performed within five percent of similarly configured systems on our Multitasking and iTunes tests. When it came to Photoshop CS2, though, the LifeBook E8410 trailed far behind the others, most likely due to its lone gigabyte of RAM (those other systems came configured with 2GB). In our anecdotal use, we had no problem with typical work (surfing the Web, typing documents) and making quick photo touch-ups with Vista's built-in image editor -- and that was without disabling the Aero-glass translucent effects.

The Fujitsu LifeBook E8410's eight-cell battery lasted two hours, 27 minutes on our taxing DVD drain test. That's pretty good for a midsize laptop, though the Lenovo 3000 N200's comparable battery held out 37 minutes longer. Our DVD battery drain test is especially gruelling, so you can expect longer life from casual Web surfing and office use.


Multimedia multitasking test (in seconds)
(Shorter bars indicate better performance)
Apple MacBook Pro Core 2 Duo 2.4GHz
875
Lenovo 3000 N200
932
Fujitsu LifeBook E8410
942
HP Pavilion dv6500t
958

Adobe Photoshop CS2 image-processing test (in seconds)
(Shorter bars indicate better performance)
HP Pavilion dv6500t
261
Lenovo 3000 N200
266
Apple MacBook Pro Core 2 Duo 2.4GHz
271
Fujitsu LifeBook E8410
441

Apple iTunes encoding test (in seconds)
(Shorter bars indicate better performance)
Apple MacBook Pro Core 2 Duo 2.4GHz
123
Lenovo 3000 N200
185
HP Pavilion dv6500t
185
Fujitsu LifeBook E8410
185

DVD battery drain test (in minutes)
(Longer bars indicate better performance)
Apple MacBook Pro Core 2 Duo 2.4GHz
215
Lenovo 3000 N200
184
Fujitsu LifeBook E8410
147
HP Pavilion dv6500t
108

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