Roccat Pyra

The Pyra is Roccat's travel mouse, which is even smaller than the Kova. Roccat attempts to make the most of the size by flanging out the base to create thumb and pinky grips, although we found that under extended use the grip is more likely to cause fatigue than a regular mouse.


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The Pyra is Roccat's travel mouse, even smaller than the Kova. Roccat attempts to make the most of the size by flanging out the base to create thumb and pinky grips, although we found that under extended use the grip is more likely to cause fatigue than a regular mouse.

At about 95mm long, this portable rodent comes with its own carry case and is available in two editions: wired and wireless. The latter comes with a tiny 2.4GHz transceiver that can be tucked into the bottom of the mouse. While the wired version costs AU$59.99, going wireless significantly increases the price, commanding AU$99.95.

The wired version just needs the driver to be installed to run at full capacity, while the wireless also needs to be synced by pressing a button on the bottom of the mouse. We found that when the mouse goes to sleep, it won't respond to movement at all — you'll have to click a button to wake it up.

Roccat includes a mini-USB cable with the wireless version to connect to the PC, but don't expect this to turn it into a corded mouse; it's for battery charging only.

The cable also adds greater balance: when you take it out, the Pyra disconcertingly rocks back and forward when you use it, with the rear lifting off the mousing surface. The corded version doesn't appear to have this issue.

Roccat Pyra UI

The basic configuration screen will look familiar to anyone who owns a Roccat mouse. (Screenshot by CBS Interactive)

The "fat tyre" scroll wheel that's also in the Kova is here, with a satisfying group of detented clunks with each spin. The Pyra can do horizontal scrolling as well, but not with the wheel — you'll have to assign the function to two different buttons to get it to work through the included software. This same functionality allows the user to do on-the-fly DPI switching, with settings of 400, 800 and 1600dpi available.

Roccat Pyra UI

Customise the buttons to your heart's content. (Screenshot by CBS Interactive)

Macros are supported, with an impressive amount built into the driver, supporting both games and applications. You can of course make your own, with the macro creator recording keypresses, and able to insert mouse events or delays. Only delays can be edited in the standard screen, requiring you to delete an event and re-record from a certain point if you want to insert new commands.

The advanced macro editor goes some way to addressing this, enabling the insertion of new letters, as well as providing the user with a graphical way of inserting delays. Unlike the Kone, we didn't have issues with the advanced macro editor, everything functioning as expected.

Roccat Pyra UI

The advanced macro editor works for the Pyra, whereas its performance has been flaky with other mice. (Screenshot by CBS Interactive)

Roccat's EasyShift technology is here too, meaning that when you hold down the EasyShift button (the left thumb button by default) every other button can have a new behaviour attributed to it. For example, the default-shifted values of the scroll wheel turn the system volume up and down.

Once you're done customising, up to five profiles can be stored on the mouse, so you can take your settings with you.

Testing both under Serious Sam: HD and Left 4 Dead, we needn't have worried about the wireless version's slight rocking — things proved to be accurate, fast and deadly. We perceived no lag comparing the wireless and corded versions. In our opinion, the wireless won out in performance due to its freedom of movement.

The Pyra is a handy little gaming mouse. It may not be the best choice for extended sessions due to its small size. But if you're travelling and need space, you could do worse than picking up one of these.

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NicholasP2 Facebook
1
Rating
 

"terrible surface-dependent tracking and far too heavy for it's size."

NicholasP2 posted a review   

The Good:Looks nice

The Bad:Everything else

An utterly terrible product.
The blue light makes it's tracking extremely poor and surface dependent. The reduced travel size does not come with a matching reduction in weight, resulting in rapid hand fatigue.
The only travel mouse I have ever used that required a high-end mousepad designed for laser-mouse gaming to get reliable tracking.

Reeks of being designed by a sales team.

hugh2112
8
Rating
 

"A decent portable mouse for gaming"

hugh2112 posted a review   
Australia

The Good:Good customisability, EasyShift functionality, easy setup, simple but pleasing aesthetics.

The Bad:Middle-click is tough, gripping is a little hard.

I managed to buy the wireless Pyra for $39 at PLE Computers in Perth, so the price has dropped a fair bit. It's an excellent mouse for that price. ROCCAT gives you a rechargeable battery so you'll save some extra money down the track since you don't have to keep buying new batteries.
Feature-wise, we have a blue optical sensor, an extra fat scroll wheel, a storage space for the nano receiver under the mouse (it is spring loaded so you hear a click when it locks into place), and a blue LED light in the 'cut' behind the scroll wheel which pulses when the mouse is in use. Pretty sure that LED acts as a low battery indicator as well. And the USB cable is pretty awesomely styled too I might add.
Performance-wise, you can shoose between 400, 800, and 1600dpi and you have 10 levels of sensitivity for each one. I use it on 1600dpi at 4th sensitivity. Macro recording works well but I hardly use them anyway so I can't give an extended review here.
What I don't like about this mouse is the middle click. It's very hard to press down on the wheel and in games when you do it a lot (i.e. Deus Ex Human Revolution), it gets annoying. I'm still trying to find a comfortable grip too after two days of using it. Mind you, I've been spoiled by my desktop's RAT 7 mouse so I just need some more time to figure it out. Also, the side button on one side is useless. I'm guessing it's there for left-handed people in which case it'll be the thumb button on the right side useless for them. Oh well, good thing back/forward is mapped to EasyShift buttons (deliberately maybe?).

 

stealth zero posted a comment   

looks cool

 

AdrianV2 posted a reply   

it looks good, has good functionalty but is really let down by the small size, 9.5cm or 95mm .. is to short and therefore uncomfortable for the serious gamer.




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User Reviews / Comments  Roccat Pyra

  • NicholasP2

    NicholasP2

    Rating1

    "An utterly terrible product.
    The blue light makes it's tracking extremely poor and surface dependent. The reduced travel size does not come with a matching reduction in weight, resulting in r..."

  • hugh2112

    hugh2112

    Rating8

    "I managed to buy the wireless Pyra for $39 at PLE Computers in Perth, so the price has dropped a fair bit. It's an excellent mouse for that price. ROCCAT gives you a rechargeable battery so you'll ..."

  • stealth zero

    stealth zero

    "looks cool"

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